review of african political economy

What is ROAPE?

Since 1974 ROAPE has provided radical analysis of trends, issues and social processes in Africa, adopting a broadly materialist interpretation of change. It pays particular attention to the political economy of inequality, exploitation and oppression, and to organised struggles against them, whether these inequities are driven by global forces or local ones such as class, race, ethnicity and gender. It sustains a critical analysis of the nature of power and the state in Africa in the context of capitalist globalisation.

Our Quarterly Journal

ROAPE is a refereed journal committed to encouraging high quality research and fostering excellence in the understanding of African political economy. It contains academic articles, debates pieces, briefings and commentary on current events relating to Africa and an active section of book reviews. If you have material which you think should be published on this site or in the journal, see How to contribute. The Review is currently noted in African Studies Abstracts Online, African Urban & Regional Science Index, EconLit, International Bibliography of the Social Sciences, International Political Science Abstracts, PAIS Select, Political Science Abstracts and SCOPUS. Individuals and institutions can SUBSCRIBE to the journal either in print or online versions, or both. If you are based in Africa and have a pressing use for the journal and no means of subscribing, please contact us.

How can I use this this website?

ROAPE is published quarterly by Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group for the ROAPE international collective. All NEW ARTICLES are available on the Taylor and Francis website. This website is run by the ROAPE international collective and provides free access to the ROAPE ARCHIVES. This consists of downloadable .pdfs of all articles published by ROAPE that are more than seven years old. The site also provides advice on how to contribute or subscribe to the journal and news and information about conferences and events that we think will be of interest to our readers.


      NEWS AND EVENTS

      NEW EDITION: April 2014


      The latest edition of ROAPE is now available on the Taylor and Francis website. VOL 41, ISSUE 140 is edited by Hannah Cross and includes two obituaries for Lionel Cliffe, articles on the place of Africana in the thought of Karl Marx, tourism in Namibia, sugar and Swaziland, jatropha and Kenya, land and Egypt, oil and the Niger Delta and Africa's place in the global information economy. In the debate section we continue discussions on the legacy of Nelson Mandela and on Matteo Rizzo's recent article on trade unionism in Tanzania.

      VIRTUAL SPECIAL EDITION: Nelson Mandela

      A Virtual Special Edition of ROAPE is now available. This special collection of previously and newly published articles is free to access online until the end of the year. The collection examines the political economy of the transition to democracy and its implications for understanding some of the social and political challenges that characterise South Africa’s unfinished liberation. Alexander Beresford edited the special edition and has written an introduction to it.

      NEW READER: Conflict and Security in Africa, October 2013

      More than any other part of the globe, Africa has become associated with conflict, insecurity and human rights atrocities. In the popular imagination and the media, overpopulation, environmental degradation and ethnic hatred dominate accounts of African violence, while in academic and policy-making circles, conflict and insecurity have also come to occupy centre stage, with resource-hungry warlords and notions of 'greed' and 'grievance' playing key explanatory roles. Since the attacks of 9/11, there has also been mounting concern that the continent's so-called 'ungoverned spaces' will provide safe havens for terrorists intent on destroying Western civilization. The Review of African Political Economy has engaged extensively with issues of conflict and security, both analysing on-going conflicts and often challenging predominant modes of explanation and interpretation. This Review of African Political Economy Reader provides a timely, comprehensive and critical contribution to contemporary debates about conflict and security on the continent. The first section, covers some of the continent's main post-Cold War conflicts and demonstrates their global connections. The articles also discuss the so-called 'resource curse', as well as the global arms trade, and reveal the complexities of the relationship between the economic and the political. The second section focuses on security as part of post-Cold War global governance, and discusses the effects of liberal peace-building as well as the link between development assistance and the 'war on terror'. The final section examines life as it continues in conditions of war and shows how insecurity reconfigures urban space, transforms social order, identities and authority. ROAPE readers can be purchased from the website of the publishers Boydell and Brewer, which also provides an interview with the editor, Rita Abrahamsen.

       

      MOST RECENT EDITION AVAILABLE FREE ON THIS SITE

      Vol 32, No. 104/5, June/Sept 2005

      SEE CONTENTS PAGE

    • – "Oiling the Wheels of Imperialism" by Giles Mohan and Tunde Zack-Williams MORE
    • – "Cultural Determinism/Hegemony/Efficacy of Defective States" by Tim Jacoby MORE
    • – "Global Flows: Terror, Oil & Strategic Philanthropy" by Sandra T Barnes MORE
    • – "Sovereignty & Democratic Exclusion in New South Africa" by Lars Buur MORE
    • – "Political Economy of Angolan Growth: Social & Regional Structure" by Steven Kyle MORE
    • – "Six Months On: What Shift in EU Approach to EPA?" by Paul Goodison MORE
    • – "Eduardo Mondlane & Rise/Fall of Mozambican Socialism" by John S Saul MORE
    • – "Poverty Reduction Strategy Papers: Now Who Calls Shots?" by Alastair Fraser MORE
    • – "Development Denied: Autocratic Mil in Post-elec Zimbabwe" by Sarah Bracking MORE
    • – "Violence/Social Order Beyond State: Somalia/Angola" by Jutta Bakonyi and Kirsti Stuvøy MORE